Blue Line

Images excerpted from Scandinavian Modern by Magnus Englund & Chrystina Schmidt. Photography by Andrew Wood. Published by © Ryland, Peters & Small. Reprinted with permission of the publisher. All rights reserved.
Images excerpted from Scandinavian Modern by Magnus Englund & Chrystina Schmidt. Photography by Andrew Wood. Published by © Ryland, Peters & Small. Reprinted with permission of the publisher. All rights reserved.

Blue Line

The collaboration between Grethe and Royal Copenhagen attracted considerable attention at the presentation of the simple and timeless faience dinnerware, Blue Line in 1965.
The dinnerware was grayed and elegant beaded with a dark blue line as the sole decoration.

Grethe had actually drawn the dinnerware for porcelain, but Royal Copenhagen wanted faience and Grethe succeeded to convert her ideas into faience ceramic.
The dinnerware was also multipurpose and space economical as the components were stackable.

Grethe her self came up with the name “Blue Line” and the dinnerware was her big breakthrough as a designer. This led to design awards in Vicenza and Copenhagen and a memorial scholarship from Kay Bojesen & wife. Blue Line ended up as one of Royal Copenhagen’s most popular dinnerwares.

“Compared to the other dinnerwares that has been in my presence … there is a humanity and kindness to Blue Line, which is very hard to find elsewhere. It is as if Blue Line just want to be filled with food. Get messy. Take part in the festive events. Soak in the sink, be dried properly and unite as one big family on the shelves in the kitchen.” Lars Hedebo Olsen, Politiken, 2004

Blue Line was in production at Royal Copenhagen from 1965- 2011.

The dinnerware is no longer in production.